State Theory of Money

So the big issue with Credit Theory is that whoever is writing all these IOUs that a money supply is based on has to be obscenely wealthy, which is why it’s usually The King or whoever who does it.

“The real impetus for the Chartalist position, in fact, came out of what came to be known as the ‘German Historical School,’ whose most famous exponent was the historian G.F. Knapp, whose State Theory of Money first appeared in 1905.”

Emperors and kings had always handled units of measure, so it makes sense they’d handle money too, under the chartalist model.

Monetary systems of measurement are remarkably stable. Under Henry II from 1154-1189, almost everyone in Europe was still using Charlemagne’s system from about 350 years earlier, even though some of the coins in his system never even existed, almost none of his coins were still around, and the ones that were were wildly variable in size/quality.

Actually Charlemagne’s system stayed in place for over 800 years, coming to be referred to as “imaginary money,” and derniers and livres were only abandoned as units of account around the time of the French Revolution.

But according to State Theory, what the money is made of (Silver or leather or fish or paper) doesn’t matter, as long as the state takes payment for taxes in it, because that becomes currency.

Actual modern banknotes are kind of the opposite though. They’re not backed by debts OF The King’s, they’re backed by debts TO the king. The Bank of England was founded in 1694 with a loan made by a consortium of bankers worth about 1.2 million Pounds. In return, they got a royal monopoly on issuing banknotes, basically that they could circulate IOUs from the king to them for that loan. (King owes bankers money for that loan, King writes a million IOUs, bankers give those IOUs to people to use as currency).

pg 47-8

Credit Theory of Money

Gavin Mitchell-Innes was an early thinker in the area, got support mostly in US and Germany (two up and coming powers at the time, not in Britain, the power at the time. This feels significant). Another name is Chartalism (from latin charta, meaning “token”).

Theory i sthat money is not a commodity but an accounting tool. “For a Credit Theorist can no more touch a dollar or a deutschmark than you can touch an hour or a cubic centimeter.”

“Historically, such abstract systems of accounting emerged long before the use of any particular token of exchange.”

Money matters because it’s an IOU. Conventional wisdom says banknote should be a promise to pay a certain amount of real money (gold/whatever), Credit Theory says banknote is just a promise to pay *something* of a certain value.

“Conceptually, the idea that a piece of gold is really just an IOU is always rather difficult to wrap one’s head around, but something like this must be true, because even when gold and silver coins were in use, they almost never circulated at their bullion value.”

This theory allows for the trading of debts. I give you something, you give me an IOU, I can give that IOU to a third party for something else. They can then give the IOU to someone else, etc, etc. All that matters for the IOU to have value is people’s faith that the original issuer is good for it.

“In this sense, the value of a unit of currency is not the measure of the value of an object, but the measure of one’s trust in other human beings.”

pg 46-7