A nation outside the nation

“The Nation of Islam was by no means the first group to advocate for a separate nation, with calls to leave America tracing back at least to emancipation. Perhaps unsurprisingly, after being granted so-called freedom, ‘there is little evidence that for Blacks in general, being American was considered desirable, even if attainable, until well into the nineteenth century.'”

“Desire for separation has typically been seen as the radical alternative to integration into the existing society. However, advocating emigration from a Western nation state is not necessarily radical, because it does not always involve an overturning of the existing social order.”

“America itself is not the problem here; the issue is that because of prejudice Black people will never be accepted. Therefore it becomes necessary to leave America and replicate “modern civilized life” but with Black faces. The structure of the existing society is maintained, but Black people are given the chance to replicate its success, just elsewhere. It is for this reason that emigration was a popular solution of White politicians to the problem caused by emancipation.”

“It is no coincidence that the word colony was used; they [the white politicians] were attempting to create a colonial relationship such as existed with European countries and their territories.”

Liberalism vs Radicalism

Liberalism: MLK and the civil rights movement as its generally considered. “Liberals acknowledge the problems of racial inequality but put them down to a lack of access to the system.” Black people are poor because they’re not treated fairly in the job market, laws are unfair because they’re underrepresented in the legislature, etc. “The system is not the problem in this analysis, just the fact that we are not fully part o fit. If Black faces were in high places then of course a different set of decisions would be made and equality would emerge.”

Radicalism: Malcolm X, who had no interest in being part of the “American nightmare.” “In the radical tradition, the system is the problem. There can be no reform, no adjustments, and we as Black people should not waste time daydreaming of equality.” … “the battle is not to get good jobs or to be elected, but to end the system of oppression and create the world in a new image.”

Malcolm on Martin

“At on time the Whites in the United States called him a racialist, and extremist, and a communist. Then the Black Muslims came along and the Whites thanked the Lord for Martin Luther King.”

Later, when Martin was mad that Malcolm had come to Selma right before Martin’s planned visit:

“I want Dr. King to know that I didn’t come to Selma to make his job difficult. I really did come thinking I could make it easier. If the White people realize what the alternative is, perhapst hey will be more willing to hear Dr. King.”

Radicalism

“As Angela Davis explained, ‘radical simply means grasping things at the root’. Radicalism is based on rejecting the fundamental principles that govern society and creating a new paradigm.”

He’s using this to contrast against “extremism,” which “is based on taking the fundamental principles of an idea to the extreme. Making them solid absolutes with no room for flexibility or different interpretations.”